Category Archives: Siervicül

October Clark: One for the road…

The results of the final Clark of the 49th Cosa were published by the Chancery this week.

Without surprise,the government easily survived the last VoC of the term, 94 votes Për to 18 Contrâ. However due to absent coalition MCs the government did so without achieving an absolute majority of seats.

RUMP leader Sir Alexandreu Davinescu unexpectedly failed to vote on the Clark, a first for him in a number of years. Sir Alexandreu was among 5 MCs, representing 50 of the 200 seats in the Cosa, who failed to vote on the Clark.

It was a disappointing Clark for Secretary of State Marti-Pair Furxheir, who saw both of his attempts to reform the term of office of the Cosa fail. The head of the Chancery is not an MZ but may in principle Clark bills relating to electoral matters.

The twin proposals would ended the need for the King to formally dissolve the Cosa at the end of its term . They would also have closed the possibity of early dissolution by fixing the term of office of the lower house, but in the case of the first would have extended that term of office to a year, and the second would have limited the usual six-month term to five Clarks. 

A related measure that would have granted the Seneschal the authority to recess the Ziu for both July and August, proposed by ModRad Senator Epic da Lhiun, was also defeated, this time due to Senäts opposition.

It was also an unfortunate Clark for the Organic Law Standing Committee, whose second set of Organic Law amendments proposed by ModRad MC Ian Plätschisch were abandoned due to the last-minute discovery of a drafting error in the bill. The OLSC is a working group of interested MZs from different parties who seek to remove redundancies and inappropriate clauses from the constitution. 

By contrast, the Ziu looked more favourably upon reform proposals made bySeneschal Sir Cresti Siervicül and FreeDem leader Senator Dien Tresplet.

Sir Cresti successfully called on the Ziu to close the door on elections for the Túischac’h of the Cosa, a reform first introduced in 2014 and which has remained controversial in practice since. Sir Cresti’s bill, if approved by referendum, will return to the previous system of appointment by the Crown on the nomination of the Seneschal, but with the Seneschal now legally required to consult other party leaders beforehand. 

Senator Tresplet’s bill would remove an historical reference to the punishment of “anti-Talossan activities” in the Organic Law. The Senator claimed that the use of the term was reminiscent of “McCarthyism” and inappropriate in modern Talossa, with which the Ziu apparently agreed, sending the amendment to referendum.

October Clark: One for the road…

The results of the final Clark of the 49th Cosa were published by the Chancery this week.

Without surprise,the government easily survived the last VoC of the term, 94 votes Për to 18 Contrâ. However due to absent coalition MCs the government did so without achieving an absolute majority of seats.

RUMP leader Sir Alexandreu Davinescu unexpectedly failed to vote on the Clark, a first for him in a number of years. Sir Alexandreu was among 5 MCs, representing 50 of the 200 seats in the Cosa, who failed to vote on the Clark.

It was a disappointing Clark for Secretary of State Marti-Pair Furxheir, who saw both of his attempts to reform the term of office of the Cosa fail. The head of the Chancery is not an MZ but may in principle Clark bills relating to electoral matters.

The twin proposals would ended the need for the King to formally dissolve the Cosa at the end of its term . They would also have closed the possibity of early dissolution by fixing the term of office of the lower house, but in the case of the first would have extended that term of office to a year, and the second would have limited the usual six-month term to five Clarks. 

A related measure that would have granted the Seneschal the authority to recess the Ziu for both July and August, proposed by ModRad Senator Epic da Lhiun, was also defeated, this time due to Senäts opposition.

It was also an unfortunate Clark for the Organic Law Standing Committee, whose second set of Organic Law amendments proposed by ModRad MC Ian Plätschisch were abandoned due to the last-minute discovery of a drafting error in the bill. The OLSC is a working group of interested MZs from different parties who seek to remove redundancies and inappropriate clauses from the constitution. 

By contrast, the Ziu looked more favourably upon reform proposals made bySeneschal Sir Cresti Siervicül and FreeDem leader Senator Dien Tresplet.

Sir Cresti successfully called on the Ziu to close the door on elections for the Túischac’h of the Cosa, a reform first introduced in 2014 and which has remained controversial in practice since. Sir Cresti’s bill, if approved by referendum, will return to the previous system of appointment by the Crown on the nomination of the Seneschal, but with the Seneschal now legally required to consult other party leaders beforehand. 

Senator Tresplet’s bill would remove an historical reference to the punishment of “anti-Talossan activities” in the Organic Law. The Senator claimed that the use of the term was reminiscent of “McCarthyism” and inappropriate in modern Talossa, with which the Ziu apparently agreed, sending the amendment to referendum.

Royal Bar: Jump start admission by scrapping the exam?

Following a query from returned citizen Viteu Marcianüs on the procedure for admission to the Talossan Bar, Seneschal Sir Cresti Siervicül has revealed that he favours “more deregulation” of the procedure, including abolition of the professional examination.

S:reu Marcianüs inquired about the existence of the law course that is one of the prerequisites for admission, along with an apprenticeship period and passing an examination. Ian Plätschisch MC also revealed that he had joined the course but that it was cancelled, and never restarted. He suggested eliminating this prerequisite, while retaining the examination.

Course instructor Sir Alexandreu Davinescu, who cited increased family and political responsibilities, stated that its return was unlikely in the immediate future.

In response to this discussion Sir Cresti , who is a former Chief Justice himself, stated that owing to “the shortage of licensed attorneys and the limited resources of the Bar, I am in favour of significantly deregulating the practice of law in Talossa”. He later explained that he would be willing to go as far as making admission to the Bar dependent on a self-certification process, eliminating the Bar exam entirely. 

Justice Litz Cjantschier, who is currently head of the Royal Bar, responded that she would be uneasy if lawyers dealing with cases where citizenship was at stake did not have demonstrably high professional standards, and suggested an expanded apprenticeship scheme, where the qualified lawyer would be responsible for monitoring the progress of the apprentice and proposing their admission at the appropriate time.

Sir Cresti replied that while he was favourable to the idea, the very shortage of lawyers would make an apprenticeship system potentially unworkable, a point agreed on by Sir Alexandreu. The latter suggested that there was a need to “bootstrap” the process by loosening the existing prerequisites, but with a return to an examination system still possible later.

Seneschal pledges amendment to scrap Tuischac’h elections

Seneschal Sir Cresti Siervicül has told ETT that he intends to “propose an OrgLaw amendment to put things back the way they were” with respect to the selection of the Lord Speaker of the Cosa, the Tuischac’h.

The Seneschal’s comments came as the Cosa finds itself without a presiding officer following the resignation of Miestrâ Schivâ in June. According to the Organic Law, a “conclave” of MCs to elect a new Tuischac’h is assembled either by the outgoing Tuischac’h or by the oldest MC, if the former is not available.

Prior to 2014, the Speaker was appointed by the King on the nomination of the Seneschal. Subsequently, the Cosa was granted the power to elect its own presiding officer. The new process has however been plagued with difficulties, with the first election challenged in el Cort Inalt for irregularities in its organisation. 

Sir Cresti, who opposed the abandonment of royal appointment, told ETT that “before [the reform] I would simply have advised the King to appoint a replacement. But my hands are kind of tied.” He therefore advocates a return to the historic system.

Sir Cresti has asked the current most senior MC, FreeDem acting leader Txec dal Nordselva, to proceed with the organisation of the election. However this has not yet been started at the time of writing. Dr dal Nordselvă has not replied to a request for comment. 

ModRad leader Senator Lüc da Schir told ETT that “electing the Tuischac’h is still a good idea, even though back when the bill was passed most of us surely hoped for some more enthusiasm on the Cosa’s side when it came to actually holding such an election”.

King and Seneschal meet in “low-key” gathering

Seneschal Sir Cresti Siervicül has revealed that he recently participated in a “low key TalossaWest gathering” in Colorado, USA.

Taking advantage of a family visit to the American West in June Sir Cresti arranged to meet with the King and other Talossans resident in Colorado. In the event HM King John, Baron Hooligan and Sir Trotxa Betiñéir were able to join the Seneschal for a Lebanese meal, followed by some beverages at a local microbrewery. 

A planned ceremony for the administration of the Seneschal’s oath did not in the end occur, but Sir Cresti stated that it was otherwise an enjoyable social occasion and that he hoped it could be repeated on his next visit.

MZs call for end to RCOR delays

The Royal Commission on Organic Law Reform, which was established by the last government to examine the reform of the fundamental law of the Kingdom, is coming under increasing criticism for the delay in the submission of its final report.

The RCOR was originally established ny the 48th Cosa in order to remove the discussion of constitutional reform from the “cockpit” of the Ziu. Then-Senator Miestrâ Schivâ proposed the RCOR Act in order to procide a non-partisan forum for discussion on reform of the Law, in particular relocating some sections into ordinary statute law.

The Commission Act ran into immediate controversy, with ModRad MZs criticising what they claimed was the haste with which the bill had been introduced, and the RUMP claiming that it was an attempt to create a false consensus around Organic Law issues. Indeed RUMP leader Sir Alexandreu Davinescu was accused by Dama Miestrâ of attempting to short-circuit the Act by proposing a non-statuatory “Organic Law Standing Committee” to examine technical changes to the constitution, a charge denied by the former.

In the event, and after a certain number of modifications insisted upon by MZs, the legislation to establish the Commission was passed. The Act provided for nomination of Commissioners partly by political parties represented in the Ziu, as well as a royal nominee. The lack of a nominee for latter post became an important source for Dama Miestrâ’s conviction that the conservative party were deliberately delaying the work of the Commission in order to sabotage it.
Part of the difficulty was the date included in the Act for the Commission to submit its final report to the Ziu. Out of a desire to avoid a lingering discussion, the initial deadline for the report was in April, despite criticism that it was unrealistic to expect the Commission to examine the whole Organic Law in that time. Due to the abortive start of the Commission’s work thanks to the lack of royal and party political nominees, the RCOR had to have its deadline extended twice.

Distain says Sir Cresti is not “puppet”, says plans on schedule

Distain Senator Lüc da Schir has rejected allegations that Seneschal Sir Cresti Siervicül is a “puppet”. The ModRad leader told ETT that Sir Cresti is leading the government and “makes all the important decisions”.

The Distain rejected recent claims by the FreeDems that RUMP leader and government Chief of Staff Sir Alexandreu Davinescu is the de facto leader of the Cabinet. Senator da Schir told ETT that Sir Alexandreu was aiding the Seneschal with “paperwork and coordinating projects”. He also claimed that in the absence of the Seneschal the coalition agreement provides for he, the Distain, to supervise the work of the government both internally and with respects to its public actions.

The Distain also pronounced himself satisfied with the progress of the government so far. Despite a delay due to legal issues, the crowd funding campaign for the issue of coinage is “being finalised and will be launched sometime in June”. He also told ETT that he was “confident” the Census would start in June as scheduled. He also commended the progress made by the Minister of Stuff, fellow ModRad Ian Plätschisch, in the website transition process.

Sir Cresti announces Coalition Cabinet

Seneschal Sir Cresti Siervicül has announced his recommendations to the King for his Cabinet. The Cabinet nominees, as first reported on Twitter by @ElTamlalt, are as follows:

Distain: Senator Lüc da Schir (MRPT)
Minister of Finance and Chief of Staff: Sir Alexandreu Davinescu MC (RUMP)
Minister of Foreign Affairs: Breneir Itravilatx MC (TNC)
Minister of Stuff: Ian Plätschisch MC (MRPT)
Minister of Culture: Senator Éovart Grischun (RUMP)
Minister of Interior: Dame Litz Cjantscheir, UrN, MC (RUMP)

No Attorney-General has been appointed, and the function will “remain under the remit of the Prime Ministry for the time being”. No Deputy Minister appointments have been announced at the time of writing.

The only returning Ministers are thus Lüc da Schir as Distain and Breneir Itravilatx as Foreign Minister. Like the Cabinets of the 48th Cosa, the Cabinet has one woman member, and also one serving Justice of el Cort pü Ìnalt (in the case of the Siervicül Cabinet, Dama Litz). The Cabinet does not have any Ministers based in the provinces of Fiova or Atatûrk though all other provinces are represented.

No coalition agreement has yet been published, so it is not clear at the time of writing what the government’s detailed priorities will be. The FreeDems have however promised scrutiny of the new government’s plans, with Miestrâ Schivâ already posting a Terpelaziun to the Minister of STUFF, S:reu Plätschisch. The Minister promised to reveal his plans once the Royal Commission on the Organic Law,, of which he is a member, has completed its work. Finance Minister Sir Alexandreu Davinescu has also stated, while discussing an issue with the backup of Wittenberg, that he is working on the 49th Cosa Budget.

The new title of “Chief of Staff” also elicited some questions from the opposition. Replying to a query from Senator C. Carlüs Xheraltescù, the Chief of Staff himself described his new role as “basically a management or clerical position, keeping track of projects, deadlines, and the like”. This seems to reflect the focus placed on ministerial accountability during the electoral campaign by the coalition parties.

King appoints “well-respected” Sir Cresti as Seneschal

HM King John has appointed Sir Cresti Siervicül MC as Seneschal. In a brief public statement, the King stated that he had been formally notified that a majority coalition of the RUMP, the ModRads and the TNC had been formed in the Cosa, as announced via press release on 26th March. Under the Organic Law, he would therefore appoint the nominee of that majority. Sir Cresti described himself as “truly humbled” by the appointment.

Sir Cresti Siervicül was recently described as “one of the most well-respected Talossans in the country” by RUMP party leader Sir Alexandreu Davinescu. According to TalossaWiki, Sir Cresti, an attorney by profession with a young family, became a Talossan in 2005. He was initially attracted by his interest in el ghleþ, the Talossan language, which he has continued to pursue as el Ladintsch Naziunal (leader of the country’s linguistic efforts). In this capacity he has published a number of linguistic works, notably Prüms Päçen, a guide for beginners in the language, which was published in association with the Ministry of Culture.

In 2007 he was knighted by King John as a member of the Order of the Nation in recognition of his services in the study of el ghleþ, and for his work as a jurist and lawmaker. Sir Cresti is Constable (personal representative of the King) in the province of Cezembre, and was an MC during the 35th Cosa before being appointed Puisne Justice of el Cort pü Inalt. He later returned to the Cosa, serving from the 44th Cosa to the present. He was a founder of the RUMP, of which he continues to be a senior member.

Sir Cresti recently became embroiled in the Canun Case, due to having failed to publicly disclose his discovery of the latter’s conviction for serious crimes in the United States. He did not reveal the information at the request of Iason Taiwos, a friend of Canun’s. He later described this as a “serious error of judgement”, and was removed from the proposed FreeDem “Cabinet of Talents” as a result of the controversy. Sir Cresti was critical of ETT’s coverage of the affair, describing it as politically motivated, an accusation rejected by the publication.

Coalition: Full text of statement

After open and free dialogue among many parties, the RUMP, the Moderate Radicals, and the Talossan National Congress have agreed to form a Government as a coalition, committing to support as Seneschal del Regipäts Talossan the well-known and well-respected Sir Cresti Siervicül, UrN. The coalition Government will be committed to active and competent governance for all Talossans and upon a program of action for provincial reform, partisan reform, electoral reform, and monarchy reform