Category Archives: Furxheir

October Clark: One for the road…

The results of the final Clark of the 49th Cosa were published by the Chancery this week.

Without surprise,the government easily survived the last VoC of the term, 94 votes Për to 18 Contrâ. However due to absent coalition MCs the government did so without achieving an absolute majority of seats.

RUMP leader Sir Alexandreu Davinescu unexpectedly failed to vote on the Clark, a first for him in a number of years. Sir Alexandreu was among 5 MCs, representing 50 of the 200 seats in the Cosa, who failed to vote on the Clark.

It was a disappointing Clark for Secretary of State Marti-Pair Furxheir, who saw both of his attempts to reform the term of office of the Cosa fail. The head of the Chancery is not an MZ but may in principle Clark bills relating to electoral matters.

The twin proposals would ended the need for the King to formally dissolve the Cosa at the end of its term . They would also have closed the possibity of early dissolution by fixing the term of office of the lower house, but in the case of the first would have extended that term of office to a year, and the second would have limited the usual six-month term to five Clarks. 

A related measure that would have granted the Seneschal the authority to recess the Ziu for both July and August, proposed by ModRad Senator Epic da Lhiun, was also defeated, this time due to Senäts opposition.

It was also an unfortunate Clark for the Organic Law Standing Committee, whose second set of Organic Law amendments proposed by ModRad MC Ian Plätschisch were abandoned due to the last-minute discovery of a drafting error in the bill. The OLSC is a working group of interested MZs from different parties who seek to remove redundancies and inappropriate clauses from the constitution. 

By contrast, the Ziu looked more favourably upon reform proposals made bySeneschal Sir Cresti Siervicül and FreeDem leader Senator Dien Tresplet.

Sir Cresti successfully called on the Ziu to close the door on elections for the Túischac’h of the Cosa, a reform first introduced in 2014 and which has remained controversial in practice since. Sir Cresti’s bill, if approved by referendum, will return to the previous system of appointment by the Crown on the nomination of the Seneschal, but with the Seneschal now legally required to consult other party leaders beforehand. 

Senator Tresplet’s bill would remove an historical reference to the punishment of “anti-Talossan activities” in the Organic Law. The Senator claimed that the use of the term was reminiscent of “McCarthyism” and inappropriate in modern Talossa, with which the Ziu apparently agreed, sending the amendment to referendum.

October Clark: One for the road…

The results of the final Clark of the 49th Cosa were published by the Chancery this week.

Without surprise,the government easily survived the last VoC of the term, 94 votes Për to 18 Contrâ. However due to absent coalition MCs the government did so without achieving an absolute majority of seats.

RUMP leader Sir Alexandreu Davinescu unexpectedly failed to vote on the Clark, a first for him in a number of years. Sir Alexandreu was among 5 MCs, representing 50 of the 200 seats in the Cosa, who failed to vote on the Clark.

It was a disappointing Clark for Secretary of State Marti-Pair Furxheir, who saw both of his attempts to reform the term of office of the Cosa fail. The head of the Chancery is not an MZ but may in principle Clark bills relating to electoral matters.

The twin proposals would ended the need for the King to formally dissolve the Cosa at the end of its term . They would also have closed the possibity of early dissolution by fixing the term of office of the lower house, but in the case of the first would have extended that term of office to a year, and the second would have limited the usual six-month term to five Clarks. 

A related measure that would have granted the Seneschal the authority to recess the Ziu for both July and August, proposed by ModRad Senator Epic da Lhiun, was also defeated, this time due to Senäts opposition.

It was also an unfortunate Clark for the Organic Law Standing Committee, whose second set of Organic Law amendments proposed by ModRad MC Ian Plätschisch were abandoned due to the last-minute discovery of a drafting error in the bill. The OLSC is a working group of interested MZs from different parties who seek to remove redundancies and inappropriate clauses from the constitution. 

By contrast, the Ziu looked more favourably upon reform proposals made bySeneschal Sir Cresti Siervicül and FreeDem leader Senator Dien Tresplet.

Sir Cresti successfully called on the Ziu to close the door on elections for the Túischac’h of the Cosa, a reform first introduced in 2014 and which has remained controversial in practice since. Sir Cresti’s bill, if approved by referendum, will return to the previous system of appointment by the Crown on the nomination of the Seneschal, but with the Seneschal now legally required to consult other party leaders beforehand. 

Senator Tresplet’s bill would remove an historical reference to the punishment of “anti-Talossan activities” in the Organic Law. The Senator claimed that the use of the term was reminiscent of “McCarthyism” and inappropriate in modern Talossa, with which the Ziu apparently agreed, sending the amendment to referendum.

Gaming: MPF promises Talossan-themed “Risk killer”

As an ardent competitor in the ongoing Risk tournament currently being hosted on Wittenberg, Secretary of State Marti-Pair Furxheir has apparently been inspired by the experience.

In a post on Wittenberg today, he announced a project to develop a Talossan-themed adaptation of the game “SmallWorld“.

The publishers of the original game describe it as a “fun, zany, light-hearted civilization board game…[in which] players vie for conquest and control of a world that is simply too small to accommodate them all”. However instead of the fantasy characters in the original game, the civilizations in what S:reu Furxheir is calling “Small Talossa” would be “factions” based on past and present Talossan political movements.

S:reu Furxheir describes the game as focused on area control and wargaming like Risk, but with the advantage of a small playing area, shorter games and a reduced element of chance. This led him to describe it as a “Risk Killer”.

Senator Ian Anglatzarâ, though reluctant to agree that SmallWorld was indeed a “Risk Killer”, was the first potential contrstant to make himself known.

Gaming: MPF promises Talossan-themed “Risk killer”

As an ardent competitor in the ongoing Risk tournament currently being hosted on Wittenberg, Secretary of State Marti-Pair Furxheir has apparently been inspired by the experience.

In a post on Wittenberg today, he announced a project to develop a Talossan-themed adaptation of the game “SmallWorld“.

The publishers of the original game describe it as a “”fun, zany, light-hearted civilization board game…[in which] players vie for conquest and control of a world that is simply too small to accommodate them all”. However instead of the fantasy characters in the original game, the civilizations in what S:reu Furxheir is calling “Small Talossa” would be “factions” based on past and present Talossan political movements.

S:reu Furxheir describes the game as focused on area control and wargaming like Risk, but with the advantage of a small playing area, shorter games and a reduced element of chance. This led him to describe it as a “Risk Killer”.

Senator Ian Anglatzarâ, though reluctant to agree that SmallWorld was indeed a “Risk Killer”, was the first potential contrstant to make himself known.

Talossa: The Next Generation

With the recent birth of Adiens, the first daughter of Finance Minister Sir Alexandreu Davinescu and his spouse, the Kingdom is experiencing a minor baby boom. 

Adiens’ birth follows that of Sir Cresti Siervicül’s child born earlier this year, and in her resignation speech in June Dama Miestrâ Schivâ revealed her wife is also expecting a child in September. The newborns join the ranks of the Dandelions, a peculiarly Talossan institution. 

Talossan citizenship is automatically granted to those who are born to or adopted by at least one Talossan parent, and are known as “Dandelions” under Talossan Law. The status was introduced to Talossan law by the 16th Cosa, and later reformed by the 35th Cosa, with Lexh.E.13.2. Children already born before their parents became Talossans may also be granted citizenship, and are known as “Broad-leaf Dandelions”. Any minor child of a citizen may be granted citizenship on application to the Secretary of State by their parent(s). 

However only at the age of 14 is the Dandelion granted full citizenship rights under Talossan law, as was recently the case for K. Furxheir, daughter of Secretary of State Marti-Pair Furxheir.

According to TalossaWiki’s article on the subject, only one other Dandelion has ever sought full Talossan citizenship, No’ac’h Ventrutx. The accession of a Dandelion to citizenship is regarded as a great occasion, with Sir Cresti describing the qualification of D:na Furxheir as “exciting”.

Talossa: The Next Generation

With the recent birth of Adiens, the first daughter of Finance Minister Sir Alexandreu Davinescu and his spouse, the Kingdom is experiencing a minor baby boom. 

Adiens’ birth follows that of Sir Cresti Siervicül’s child born earlier this year, and in her resignation speech in June Dama Miestrâ Schivâ revealed her wife is also expecting a child in September. The newborns join the ranks of the Dandelions, a peculiarly Talossan institution. 

Talossan citizenship is automatically granted to those who are born to or adopted by at least one Talossan parent, and are known as “Dandelions” under Talossan Law. The status was introduced to Talossan law by the 16th Cosa, and later reformed by the 35th Cosa, with Lexh.E.13.2. Children already born before their parents became Talossans may also be granted citizenship, and are known as “Broad-leaf Dandelions”. Any minor child of a citizen may be granted citizenship on application to the Secretary of State by their parent(s). 

However only at the age of 14 is the Dandelion granted full citizenship rights under Talossan law, as was recently the case for K. Furxheir, daughter of Secretary of State Marti-Pair Furxheir.

According to TalossaWiki’s article on the subject, only one other Dandelion has ever sought full Talossan citizenship, No’ac’h Ventrutx. The accession of a Dandelion to citizenship is regarded as a great occasion, with Sir Cresti describing the qualification of D:na Furxheir as “exciting”.

SoS opens discussion on 12-month Cosa term

Secretary of State Marti-Pair Furxheir has introduced a proposal to alter the present 6-month term of office of the Cosa. 

The head of the Chancery is not a Member of the Ziu but has the Organic Law right to introduce bills for discussion into the legislative Hopper. While stating that he himself is “not sure it is a good idea”, he has decided to advance the debate around fixed election cycles, which was a major source of conflict berween the Crown and the then government during the 48th Cosa.

S:reu Furxheir outlined two proposals in his Bill. The first would reduce the term of the Cosa from “roughly” six months to five, and fix the election dates in December and June of each year. The second proposal would fix the general election date in January of each year, with a four-month “session” every six months, with a recess in July and August. 

Seneschal Sir Cresti Siervicül stated that as he appreciates the “tradition” of both the six clark term and the possibility of early dissolution, he would have to weigh the proposals carefully. However he also stated that in contemplating an annual Cosa he would have suggested a similar schema. 

ModRad Senator Epic da Lhiun also welcomed the discussion, in particular the recess proposal, stating that during the Summer months governments are “burdened” by public apathy. 

While expressing reservations about the timing of the election in the proposals, and promising more details about his own thoughts on a 12-month Cosa, ModRad MC Glüc da Dhi also welcomed the proposal.

49th Cosa: Party leaders vote in May Clark

On 4th May, RUMP leader Sir Alexandreu Davinescu MC revealed his Clark votes. Unsurprisingly supporting the Budget, the Minister of Finance did however vote contrâ on D:na Schepa-Carreido’s Resident Cunstaval Amendment, claiming that it “didn’t make sense”, given the primary and largely ceremonial role of the Cunstavals is to act as “the voice of the Throne in the provinces”. He suggested that a better route would be to allow provinces to remove Cunstavals who act inproperly or who neglect their duties.

Sir Alexandreu abstained on both Making the Bosphorous Great Again Bill and on the Provincial Catchment Area Reform Bill, explaining that while in the latter case he disagreed with its impact on his home province of Maritiimi-Maxhestic he wished to acknowledge the work put into the proposal by its sponsors.

Finally, the Cabinet Chief of Staff stated that he was voting për on the BHAID Disbursement (II) Bill and on the VoC, declaring with respect to the latter that the coalition is “getting things done, and it’s a welcome change”.

In addition to her contrâ on the Budget and the VoC, FreeDem leader Dama Miestrâ Schivâ MC also voted against her party colleague Chirbi Scherpa-Carreido’s Resident Cunstaval Amendment. She explained that the latter proposal was “against the party policy here that we will not be proposing or voting for any OrgLaw amendments until the RCOR [Royal Commission on Organic Law Reform] has finished its work”.

As reported by ETT, the FreeDem leader also opposed the VoC, declaring that as far as the Budget and VoC were concerned those interested in her reasons should see “four words: HER MAJESTY’S LOYAL OPPOSITION”.

The FreeDem leader however voted për on the BHAID Disbursement (II)Bill as well as the Provincial Area Catchment Reform Bill proposed by Senator Lüc da Schir.

The FreeDem leader also announced that she would abstain on Senator da Lhiun’s proposed condemnation of Turkish president Erdogan. She claimed this was due to being “suspicious” of using Ziu legislation to make topical political statements, as well as feeling that there were worthier targets for such treatment than the “humourless authoritarianism” of the AKP government, such as Russian president Vladimir Putin.

In other Clark news, following complaints from Republican leader Col. Maximo Carbonel, Secretary of State Marti-Pair Furxheir has apologised for inadvertantly leaving a bill proposed by the former off of the May Clark. Col. Carbonel’s bill deals with the procedure for the  dissolution of the Ziu at the end of its term. S:reu Furxheir ascribed this to a technical problem due to how the Republican leader had published his text in the Call for Bills.

49th Cosa Election: King appoints Electoral Commission

HM King John has appointed the Election Commission for the 49th Cosa election. Justices Litz Cjantscheir, Txec dal Nordselvă and Beneditsch Ardprestéir join Secretary of State Marti-Pair Furxheir on the body which according to the Organic Law “shall independently confirm the final tally and together shall certify the election”.

Just prior to the royal announcement, S:reu Furxheir had expressed public concern that the election would be delayed due to what he claimed was royal inaction with respect to appointing the Election Commission, as  that the new automated voting system had to certified by that body first. S:reu Furxheir insisted he had reminded King John of this and that it was a “huge problem”.

A number of commentators however pointed out that such a certification was not yet necessary under the law, and that the election would be held under the established rules. The change in the law, known as the Automatic Voting Validation Amendment, is included among the referenda to be voted on during the 49th Cosa election.

Justice dal Nordselvă also stated that “in fairness to the king, he asked the advice of the UC Justices a couple weeks ago on whom he should appoint and notified us at that time who he was going to choose”.

Concerns about the availability of Justice Ardprestéir were expressed by RUMP Senator Éovart Grischun, who claimed the judge was “AWOL”. This was denied by Justice dal Nordselvă, who stated that despite a low public profile Justice Ardprestéir “does participate in camera with the other justices”.

All-party Debate: Rebuttals and a clash over rules

Debate moderator Marti-Pair Furxheir announced on 1st February an opportunity for rebuttal. S:reu Furxheir stated that “each party will get to rebut ONE answer from ONE question, from ONE party”, and that participants should “choose wisely”.

The rebuttal order was announced as MRPT, RUMP, TNC and FreeDems, with closing statements to follow in reverse order. The TNC ultimately waived their right to rebuttal.

ModRad leader Senator Lüc da Schir chose to address the response of RUMP leader Sir Alexandreu Davinescu to the fourth question of the debate, relating to constitutional reform.

He expressed scepticism at the RUMP leaders commitment to reform along the lines of the 3/4 Majority Amendment, emphasising again the role of ModRad MZs in its passage.

He insisted on the monarchism of his party, but that it supported reforms to ensure the King “did not forget where his power came from” and challenged the RUMP leader to state whether he could expect ModRad support while being unwilling to specify the reforms he had in mind.

RUMP leader Sir Alexandreu Davinescu, claiming that Senator da Schir had gone beyond a rebuttal in his remarks, requested the opportunity to respond directly to the ModRad leader, outside of the rebuttal rules.

This was after some hesitation ultimately denied by S:reu Furxheir, with Society President Dr Txec dal Nordselvă publicly disagreeing with any change, while insisting that he did not wish to impose his view on S:reu Furxheir. Sir Alexandreu stated in a comment to ETT that “it wasn’t ideal” that Dr dal Nordselvă intervened, as he is deputy leader of the FreeDems.

Claiming that he felt obligated to respond to the ModRad leader’s challenge, Sir Alexandreu stated that in his opinion the Proclamation Crisis showed the “dangers” of royal power, even if he insisted on the positive legacy of monarchy in Talossa.

He rejected what he called the mischaracterisation of his party’s position on the issue, which he defined as support for prudent reform of the institution of monarchy, but “stalwart” opposition to republicanism, or to any attempt to make the monarchy a purely ceremonial office. He stated that whom the MRPT chose to support was their affair, declaring that the party wished to continue to “find solutions that everyone can support”.

With TNC leader Breneir Itravilatx finally having declined his opportunity for rebuttal on 4th February, FreeDem leader Miestrâ Schivâ chose to address the RUMP leader’s response to the fifth question of the debate, relating to the RUMP’s ability to form an active government.

Claiming that Sir Alexandreu’s response was “disingenuous”, the FreeDem leader claimed that in what she claimed was the absence of a truly active RUMP team, a vote for the party was a “blank cheque” to the RUMP leader, and that certain members of the RUMP were “only interested in Talossa if the RUMP are in control”. She contrasted this with the “active and competent” government team she claimed the FreeDems had assembled.

She also claimed the TNC were a “one-man band” despite the protestations of its leader, and that the ModRads “have a team” but claimed that their recent record in government left doubts as to their capacity.