Category Archives: ModRads

ModRads: da Schir launches Sixth Party Congress

Senator Lüc da Schir has launched the Sixth ModRad Party Congress, serving as Congress Leader for the first time in three years.

The Senator from Benito described the developments since his last stint presiding over the Congress as “eventful”, listing his party’s participation in three governments, and their conquest of a plurality of Senäts seats.

He also claimed that the “proud centrists, European liberals, moderate monarchists, firebrand progressives” in his party were able to achieve much of their manifesto aims, “while leaving the partisan bickering to others”. The question for the delegates now, according to the ModRad leader, was “how can we keep improving Talossa and our party?”

The MRPT Congress will run until 12th November, with party members voting on the manifesto.and party statutes, as well as choosing a new Party Whip.

[ETT: contributor Inxheneu Crovâ will deliver an address to the Congress this weekend, in a personal capacity]

ModRads: da Schir launches Sixth Party Congress

Senator Lüc da Schir has launched the Sixth ModRad Party Congress, serving as Congress Leader for the first time in three years.

The Senator from Benito described the developments since his last stint presiding over the Congress as “eventful”, listing his party’s participation in three governments, and their conquest of a plurality of Senäts seats.

He also claimed that the “proud centrists, European liberals, moderate monarchists, firebrand progressives” in his party were able to achieve much of their manifesto aims, “while leaving the partisan bickering to others”. The question for the delegates now, according to the ModRad leader, was “how can we keep improving Talossa and our party?”

The MRPT Congress will run until 12th November, with party members voting on the manifesto.and party statutes, as well as choosing a new Party Whip.

[ETT: contributor Inxheneu Crovâ will deliver an address to the Congress this weekend, in a personal capacity]

Distain says Sir Cresti is not “puppet”, says plans on schedule

Distain Senator Lüc da Schir has rejected allegations that Seneschal Sir Cresti Siervicül is a “puppet”. The ModRad leader told ETT that Sir Cresti is leading the government and “makes all the important decisions”.

The Distain rejected recent claims by the FreeDems that RUMP leader and government Chief of Staff Sir Alexandreu Davinescu is the de facto leader of the Cabinet. Senator da Schir told ETT that Sir Alexandreu was aiding the Seneschal with “paperwork and coordinating projects”. He also claimed that in the absence of the Seneschal the coalition agreement provides for he, the Distain, to supervise the work of the government both internally and with respects to its public actions.

The Distain also pronounced himself satisfied with the progress of the government so far. Despite a delay due to legal issues, the crowd funding campaign for the issue of coinage is “being finalised and will be launched sometime in June”. He also told ETT that he was “confident” the Census would start in June as scheduled. He also commended the progress made by the Minister of Stuff, fellow ModRad Ian Plätschisch, in the website transition process.

Coalition: Full text of statement

After open and free dialogue among many parties, the RUMP, the Moderate Radicals, and the Talossan National Congress have agreed to form a Government as a coalition, committing to support as Seneschal del Regipäts Talossan the well-known and well-respected Sir Cresti Siervicül, UrN. The coalition Government will be committed to active and competent governance for all Talossans and upon a program of action for provincial reform, partisan reform, electoral reform, and monarchy reform

49th Cosa Election: FreeDems largest party in Cosa, TNC make breakthrough

The Chancery has published the unverified results of the 49th Cosa Election. After 199 of 200 seats have been provisionally allocated, and contrary to most expectations, the FreeDems have achieved their goal of overtaking the RUMP as the Kingdom’s largest party:

Votes per party
FreeDems: 39 votes (+9)
RUMP: 36 votes (-7)
ModRads: 22 votes (-7)
TNC: 17 votes (NEW)
Progressives: 2 votes (-7)
Republicans: 2 votes (NEW)

Seven citizens voted “present”, down from 9 in the 48th Cosa election. A total of 19 votes were cast for parties unrepresented in the 48th Cosa, compared to 16 for “new” parties in the last election.

Hailing the result as “historic”, FreeDem leader Miestrâ Schivâ invited the leaders of the other non-RUMP parties to contact her, stating “lets set up a government”. The FreeDem pledge to avoid traditional coalition, expand the role of non-political activities in Talossa and to maintain a hard line against royal “tyranny”” appear to have struck a chord with voters. With 66 seats, the FreeDem leader is however considerably short of a parliamentary majority, and will need to make arrangements with at least the ModRads to be assured of a clear majority in the Cosa:

Seats by party (199/200)
FreeDems: 66 (+19)
RUMP: 61 (-7)
ModRads: 37 (-9)
TNC: 29 (NEW)
Progressive: 3 (-11)*
Republican: 3 (NEW)*
* Provisional. Pending allocation of final seat

RUMP leader Sir Alexandreu Davinescu congratulated the FreeDems for their “strong showing”, and also congratulated the TNC for demonstrating that “new parties have a lot to offer Talossa”. Despite a series of ambitious campaign promises and an unsparing critique of what he claimed was the negligence of the coalition throughout its term in office, the RUMP leader appears to have been unable to convince voters that his party was essential to the next government. Critically for the RUMP, this new decline in support means that they have lost the blocking minority in the Cosa that gave them considerable influence in Organic Law matters. Sir Alexandreu also lost his bid to unseat ModRad Epic da Lhiun as Senator for Mariitimi-Maxhestic.

The ModRads, whose dramatic exit from the previous coalition led to considerable mutual recrimination between them and the FreeDems during the campaign, by contrast appear to have paid a price for their Christmas gambit. Having disavowed any ambition to lead the next government early in the campaign, the party appears to have suffered from the successful framing of the race as a Schivâ/Davinescu horse race, as well as competition from the TNC, led by ex-ModRad Breneir Itravilatx.

The TNC created the other surprise of the election, with a total of 17 votes in their first outing. With the “outsider” parties of the 48th Cosa apparently defunct, the TNC may have picked up support from heir now homeless voters. The party may also have profited from the decline in ModRad support, as well as the collapse in votes for the Progs, who were reduced to residual status with only 2 votes after a late start to their campaign.

Another minor party, Colonel Carbonel’s Republican Party, also has a total of two votes,  leaving the Chancery to decide how to allocate the final seat between them.

All-party Debate: Closing Statements

Closing the debate for the FreeDems, Miestrâ Schivâ claimed that in voting for the her party one would be voting for an “active and competent government” and a committed Seneschal. A FreeDem government would have a reform agenda, stating that the “King needs to be brought under control”, and that reform of the judiciary and Chancery would also be priorities. She also reaffirmed her party’s commitment to promoting a “non-political” Talossa.

She stated that despite her fatigue at what she described as a culture of personal denigration in politics she would carry on to “get the job done”. She declared that if elected she would not serve more than one term as Seneschal, and was actively considering leaving politics altogether, but not until she had achieved her aims in government and “prepared her successors”.

TNC leader Breneir Itravilatx declared that the major issues facing the country are now known, but that the question for voters now is which party can lead the process of reform.  These issues are in his view reform of the monarchy and of the functioning of government,  and the opening up of greater cultural opportunities to all citizens.

He declared that the TNC was ready to work with other parties to implement its platform, which he described as “not a list of promises but as a list of solutions”.

RUMP leader Sir Alexandreu Davinescu declared that his party was “ready to work for you”, and that after three terms in opposition his party was prepared for government, and that it was the only party that had made itself accountable for delivering on its promises. Claiming that his party had “plans” and sufficient “talent” to lead the government, he also declared that his party was “ready to lead” and was “willing to work with others” in the Ziu.

The RUMP leader claimed that while they had positive aspects to their leadership and programmes, both the FreeDems and the ModRads had been ill-prepared and ineffective in government, and that as a new party the TNC had no record. He declared that only his party could “get Talossa moving again”.

ModRad leader Senator Lüc da Schir claimed that support for his party was “a vote for liberalism and progressivism”. He denied that a vote for the MRPT was a “spoilt vote”, declaring that his party would have “considerable leverage” over the next government, and that without the “centrist alternative offered by the MRPT the Ziu would become a “pit of political hatred”.

He cited reform of the monarchy and of geographic assignment, as well as the promotion of non-political cultural endeavours, as the top priorities of his party. . He also stated that “legislatively speaking” his party had a number of achievements to its credit,  and that it was able to find compromise with other parties. He pointed to the reform of foreign affairs policy as an example of these achievements.

Closing the debate, co-moderator Marti-Pair Furxheir thanked the participants, and stated that he looked forward to his next opportunity to organise the debates. He also intimated humorously that delicious, delicious pastries would be a welcome reward for his efforts, if anyone was so minded.

All-party Debate: Rebuttals and a clash over rules

Debate moderator Marti-Pair Furxheir announced on 1st February an opportunity for rebuttal. S:reu Furxheir stated that “each party will get to rebut ONE answer from ONE question, from ONE party”, and that participants should “choose wisely”.

The rebuttal order was announced as MRPT, RUMP, TNC and FreeDems, with closing statements to follow in reverse order. The TNC ultimately waived their right to rebuttal.

ModRad leader Senator Lüc da Schir chose to address the response of RUMP leader Sir Alexandreu Davinescu to the fourth question of the debate, relating to constitutional reform.

He expressed scepticism at the RUMP leaders commitment to reform along the lines of the 3/4 Majority Amendment, emphasising again the role of ModRad MZs in its passage.

He insisted on the monarchism of his party, but that it supported reforms to ensure the King “did not forget where his power came from” and challenged the RUMP leader to state whether he could expect ModRad support while being unwilling to specify the reforms he had in mind.

RUMP leader Sir Alexandreu Davinescu, claiming that Senator da Schir had gone beyond a rebuttal in his remarks, requested the opportunity to respond directly to the ModRad leader, outside of the rebuttal rules.

This was after some hesitation ultimately denied by S:reu Furxheir, with Society President Dr Txec dal Nordselvă publicly disagreeing with any change, while insisting that he did not wish to impose his view on S:reu Furxheir. Sir Alexandreu stated in a comment to ETT that “it wasn’t ideal” that Dr dal Nordselvă intervened, as he is deputy leader of the FreeDems.

Claiming that he felt obligated to respond to the ModRad leader’s challenge, Sir Alexandreu stated that in his opinion the Proclamation Crisis showed the “dangers” of royal power, even if he insisted on the positive legacy of monarchy in Talossa.

He rejected what he called the mischaracterisation of his party’s position on the issue, which he defined as support for prudent reform of the institution of monarchy, but “stalwart” opposition to republicanism, or to any attempt to make the monarchy a purely ceremonial office. He stated that whom the MRPT chose to support was their affair, declaring that the party wished to continue to “find solutions that everyone can support”.

With TNC leader Breneir Itravilatx finally having declined his opportunity for rebuttal on 4th February, FreeDem leader Miestrâ Schivâ chose to address the RUMP leader’s response to the fifth question of the debate, relating to the RUMP’s ability to form an active government.

Claiming that Sir Alexandreu’s response was “disingenuous”, the FreeDem leader claimed that in what she claimed was the absence of a truly active RUMP team, a vote for the party was a “blank cheque” to the RUMP leader, and that certain members of the RUMP were “only interested in Talossa if the RUMP are in control”. She contrasted this with the “active and competent” government team she claimed the FreeDems had assembled.

She also claimed the TNC were a “one-man band” despite the protestations of its leader, and that the ModRads “have a team” but claimed that their recent record in government left doubts as to their capacity.

49th Cosa Election: ModRads announce party list, following FreeDems and TNC

ModRad  Party Whip Ian Plätschisch has announced the MRPT Cosa candidate list for the 49th Cosa election. Party members volunteer for a place on the list, and the entire membership ratifies each candidacy, though apparently candidates may also be added by acclamation subsequently.

In place “no. 11” of the list is outgoing Senator for Maritiimi-Maxhestic, Magniloqueu Épiqeu da Lhiun. The party traditionally reserves this place for Senate candidates in contested elections. Senator da Lhiun faces RUMP leader Sir Alexandreu Davinescu in this year’s only contested Senate race so far. S:reu Platschisch confirmed to ETT that the ModRads will divide the total Cosa seats equally among their candidates.

According to Talossa’s electoral law, parties are not required to present formal lists of candidates as in other party list proportional representation systems. Instead each party leader may assign their party’s shares of the Cosa’s 200 seats at their discretion, with a maximum of “10 times the number of seats in the Cosa, divided by the numbers of ballots cast for the Cosa in the most recent General Election, rounded up to the next integer” allowed for each individual. This may be done at any time before the voting on the first Clark, begins and need not be announced in advance of the election. Vacant seats are filled by royal appointment, on the nomination of the party leader.

Reform of this system has been a long-time policy goal of both ModRad and FreeDem parties, with the RUMP opposed to reducing the freedom of the parties to allocate their seats as they see fit. However the parties have adopted their own internal rules to determine the seat allocations.

Both the FreeDems and the TNC have also presented candidate lists. The FreeDems have adopted a weighted list, where the top five candidates of the party (the “A team”) will be allocated 15 seats each, and the remaining five would get 5 seats each, with any surplus divided equally among the candidates. According to party leader Miestrâ Schivâ, this system was adopted in preference to an equal division as the latter was “not feasible due to the different abilities of various candidates to commit”.

The TNC announced a three-person candidate list after a lively controversy over whether it was a “one-man party” or not. The announcement does not indicate the precise allocation of its Cosa seats, but may follow the ModRad practice of equal division. (ETT was unable to reach TNC leader Breneir Itravilatx for comment before publication).

RUMP leader Sir Alexandreu Davibescu MC told ETT that the “Team” mentioned in the RUMP’s election advertising “would be our Cosa list”. He stated that the RUMP also weighs seat allocations “giving the lion’s share to proven MCs… New MCs are given a much smaller share.”

All-party Debate: Rapid fire round

In what he lightheartedly called a “shocking twist”, debate moderator Marti-Pair Furxheir gave the fifth and penultimate part of the 49th Cosa All-party Debate a “unique” format, asking each participant an individual question. S:reu Furxheir also announced that opportunities for rebuttal and for closing statements will follow in the coming days.

On being asked “how does the RUMP plan to deliver on it’s extensive promise when it appears to lack a sufficient number of active members?”, RUMP leader Sir Alexandreu Davinescu responded with a theatrical “sigh”, and proceeded to explain that he had asked well-known members of his party where the problem might lay, but that they “couldn’t figure it out”.

He stated that his party would rely on “the same RUMP-style Cabinet of Talents recently adopted by the Free Democrats” in the event of securing an absolute majority, and would have “zero difficulty” in meeting its campaign promises.

FreeDem leader Miestrâ Schivâ was asked given her “hot temper” and her party’s rejection of coalition, “how do the Free Democrats plan to control the Ziu” after the election? The FreeDem leader agreed that she does indeed have a fiery temperament, especially when faced with “what I consider to be lies and bullying”. She stated however that she believed Talossan politicians need to behave with “more respect and less knee-jerk hostility” towards one another and that she was “attempting to lead by example”.

She also said that, absent an absolute majority, she was confident that the FreeDems would be able to find an agreement with other parties based on “comity, trust and policy agreement.”

ModRad leader Senator Lüc da Schir was asked given the perception of a RUMP-FreeDem two party race for Seneschal “what does the MRPT have to say to a strategic voter unsure how to cast his vote and how does the MRPT feel about this portrayal of a 2 party race?” The ModRad leader replied that his party is “still…the premier option for liberals, progressives, centrists and moderate monarchists”.

Claiming that no party will win an outright majority, he declared that this would put the MRPT “in a position of strength even outside of the Cabinet”. Describing bipolar politics as “deleterious” he claimed that a Cosa dominated by the FreeDems and the RUMP would be “a pit of confrontation and antagonism”, and that a vote for e MRPT would not be “wasted”, but would be for a party that “got things done”.

When asked about the recent controversy over his party’s scope and ability to deliver on its platform, TNC leader Breneir Itravilatx defended his movement as “a new and small party”. He accepted that it did not have a “full slate” of candidates, but that it was founded explicitly “with the goal of participating in coalition government”, and with an “optimistic and hopeful” ethos.

Claiming that “cooperation and compromise produce stable and productive governments”, he stated that his party hoped to build a tripartite coalition. He declared that the “failures” of the previous government were “not a sign of the inherent unworkability of coalitions” but demonstrated the importance of “accountability” and “respect”. He explicitly praised the ModRad leader’s acceptance of “responsibility” for the problems of the coalition, declaring that “we look forward to working with them in future”.

Stating that he did not accept what he described as recent attempts to “denigrate” his party, he declared that he “responded forcefully, firmly and did not back down” and that he would respond in an “aggressive” fashion to those who lack “respect and cordiality” towards him.