Category Archives: Cosâ

Four MCs Out for Failure to Vote

Secretary of State Marti-Pair Furxheir has announced that four Members of the Cosa have lost their seats for failing to vote in two consecutive Clarks.

Those exiting their elected roles include Ian da Bitour, Owen  Edwards, and Brad Holmes—who previously lost his MC seat in November 2015 for the same reason.

Most surprising is the loss by first-term MC Inxhenéu Crovâ. A former editor at ETT, Crova announced in November 2016 that he was extending his leave of absence until after the election, to avoid the perception of conflict of interest, but presumably also to devote more effort to campaigning on Wittenberg. However, even after a successful run for office, Crovâ was never to return. The ETT offices were eventually declared abandoned and the publication placed under new management.

Chancery prepares for 50th Cosa election

Secretary of State Marti-Pair Furxheir has published the rules for the 50th Cosa election.

Parties planning to contest the election are encouraged to pre-register with the Chancery. As well as the Cosa election, four provinces will be electing a Senator, three under the auspices of the Chancery. 

Benito and Vuode’s Senators are up for election following the usual schedule, while Florencia and Fiova are holding by-elections.

Benito Senator and ModRad Lüc da Schir has already announced he intends to seek an additional term in the Senäts. No other candidate has yet announced in this contest.

In the case of Vuode Senator Grischun has publicly announced that he will not seek an additional term as Senator. No candidate to replace him has emerged since this announcement.

Florencia will be voting to permanently replace its Upper House representative after the resignation and subsequent renunciation of citizenship of Pôl d’Aurìbuérg earlier this year. Mà la Mhà was appointed as a temporary relacement and appears to be returning to activity after a series of family bereavements limited his,Talossan time.

Fiova will also elect a Senator to replace C. Carlüs Xheraltescú following his failure to vote on two consecutive Clarks. Fiova organises its own Senäts elections and so does not depend on the Chancery system.

The Chancery traditionally publishes the rules of the election well.in advance of the actual launch. At the time of writing the King has yet to dissolve the Cosa as required under the Organic Law.

Chancery prepares for 50th Cosa election

Update: Five provinces will have Senäts elections this election. Incumbent Senator Sevastáin Pinátsch will also be seeking re-election (see comment)

Secretary of State Marti-Pair Furxheir has published the rules for the 50th Cosa election.

Parties planning to contest the election are encouraged to pre-register with the Chancery. As well as the Cosa election, four provinces will be electing a Senator, three under the auspices of the Chancery.

Benito and Vuode’s Senators are up for election following the usual schedule, while Florencia and Fiova are holding by-elections.

Benito Senator and ModRad Lüc da Schir has already announced he intends to seek an additional term in the Senäts. No other candidate has yet announced in this contest.

In the case of Vuode Senator Grischun has publicly announced that he will not seek an additional term as Senator. No candidate to replace him has emerged since this announcement.

Florencia will be voting to permanently replace its Upper House representative after the resignation and subsequent renunciation of citizenship of Pôl d’Aurìbuérg earlier this year. Mà la Mhà was appointed as a temporary relacement and appears to be returning to activity after a series of family bereavements limited his Talossan time.

Fiova will also elect a Senator to replace C. Carlüs Xheraltescú following his failure to vote on two consecutive Clarks. Fiova organises its own Senäts elections and so does not depend on the Chancery system.

The Chancery traditionally publishes the rules of the election well in advance of the actual launch. At the time of writing the King has yet to dissolve the Cosa as required under the Organic Law.

Anglatzarâ blasts “coffin nail” 12-month Cosa plan

Cezembre Senator Ian Anglatzarâ has strongly criticised the “12 month Cosa” Amendment currently under discussion in the Hopper. The Senator described the proposals as “coffin nails” for the Kingdom.

The Amendment, proposed by Secretary of State Marti-Pair Furxheir, has gone through considerable evolution since first proposed, but would eliminate one of the two Cosa elections currently held each year. Under discussion also is a related proposal to shift Senäts elections to July, with half the provinces electing a Senator each year.

Claiming that a “pattern” exists where elections are more “engaging” than government, the Senator describes reducing the number of elections as “the wrong way to go”, and that the proposals would be worse than the status quo.

The Senator, an independent who was elected last year, is a veteran Talossan and was a citizen of the Republic until Reunison. His stance contrasts with the positive interest shown by a number of senior political personalities, from both government and opposition, in the proposals.

FreeDem leader calls for action against “lawless” King

In a hard-hitting speech to the Cosa FreeDem leader Dama Miestrâ Schivâ declared that at the moment majority opinion in her party favours a no vote on confidence, on the basis that the incoming coalition is not prepared to take action to “bring the lawless, unaccountable King to heel”.

According to the speech, delivered to the Cosa today, the FreeDem leader took aim at what she described as the “corrupt” relationship between the RUMP and the Crown, and comparing the other coalition parties to the “satellite” parties of the former Eastern Bloc states. The FreeDem leader declared that in her view her party will withhold confidence in the government, despite the calibre of its individual members, until it demonstrates a commitment to reform of the monarchy.

Dama Miestrâ also said that party sentiment was also against 49RZ3, which would reform the method by which the Cosa is dissolved in order to avoid delays in elections due to royal inaction, as occurred before the 49th Cosa election. She said this was due to her party’s decision to oppose any changes to the Organic Law until the Royal Commission has submitted its report, as well as objections to allowing the King to “fail to do his job with no consequences”.

The FreeDem leader has been a harsh critic of the King’s recent comportment in office, notably his ongoing failure to pronounce himself on 48RZ15, an Organic Law amendment  that would curtail the Crown’s ability to block constitutional changes. The so-called 3/4 Majority Amendment was passed with overwhelming majorities in the Ziu and by popular vote, but its legal status is uncertain until the King either proclaims it law, or “explicitly refuses” to do so, thus nullifying it.

Dama Miestrâ also criticised some of the King’s comments in the aftermath if the Canun Case revelations which she claimed were “insulting” to victims of abuse, as well as recent statements with respect to the law on the appointment of the Tuischac’h, which Dama Miestrâ claimed demonstrate a lack of respect for legal norms.

Reacting to the speech, ModRad deputy leader and Minister of STUFF Ian Plätschisch MC rejected the accusation that the government were not serious about reform of the monarchy. He stated that “it is difficult to make reforms when all OrgLaw amendments are considered an attack on the Royal Commission”. He also pointed to the work of government members in the Commission, including Sir Cresti, and the latter’s willingness to further extend its deadline for submission of its report.

Schivâ calls for “Website Responsibility” in First Clark

FreeDem leader Miestrâ Schivâ, now an MC after leaving the Other House following the election, has proposed the “Website Responsibility Bill” in the 1st Clark of the 49th Cosa.

Dama Schivâ claims that the current system, which places responsibility for official Talossan websites in the hands of the Scribery, has led to “neglect” and a “conflict of responsibility” with the Government. She therefore proposes to move responsibility for the nation’s internet presence to the Ministry of Stuff, leaving the Scribery responsible for the publication of the Organic Law and legal codes of the Kingdom.

The Bill as published in the Clark is an amended version of the initial project, which would have also made the Scribe responsible for maintaining a list of public officials, and would have made the Chancery responsible for the technical infrastructure of the web presence. Dama Schivâ stated that in her view the Scribery should be absorbed into the Chancery, and the latter should assume responsibility for the technical infrastructure in the interests of efficiency.

Commenting on the earlier version of the bill in the Hopper,  RUMP leader Sir Alexandreu Davinescu praised the desire to “clarify responsibility”, but felt that the initial version went too far in placing “onerous” tasks in the hands of the Scribe. He also questioned increasing the responsibilities of the Chancery, asking if “you are at all concerned about centralizing so much power?” As head of the Chancery S:reu Furxheir himself stated he was open to a number of possibilities for reform, but that his concern was “not [to] control people but to ensure results”.

After expressing some doubt as to whether her measure would receive support from the government parties in any form, Dama Schivâ appears to have accepted some of the suggestions received by deleting the most controversial elements of the bill. Indeed the amended measure has in fact received support from within the coalition and from the Chancery, with Seneschal Sir Cresti Siervicül, Sir Alexandreu and ModRad MC Glüc da Dhi expressing their satisfaction. S:reu Furxheir declared that it was a “major piece of legislation”.

Aside from Dama Schivâ’s bill the Clark contains two others proposed by S:reu Furxheir himself on election dates and on the organisation of the Chancery.

49th Cosa Election: “Captive” seats may make the difference in a close election

[UPDATE: The vote percentages below were slightly off in the first version of this post due to an unsaved revision.]

According to the latest figures from the Chancery, Talossa has a total population of 274 citizens, of whom 243 are “active” (i.e., those who have reached the age of majority and who have fulfilled the minimum obligation of regularly voting in national elections). While predictions are hazardous, we do know that in the 48th Cosa election there was a 58% voter turnout nationally, so a 50% turnout is probably a safe assumption.

This gives us a “probable” electorate of  121 voters. And since the vast majority of these electors are not regularly active on Wittenberg, it is anybody’s guess how they will react to the particularly unsettled political conditions the Kingdom has experienced since last July. The political parties do however have a means by which they can reduce this uncertainty: their party members.

Based solely on the publicly announced candidate lists of the FreeDems, ModRads and TNC, the publicly disclosed membership of the RUMP, as well as Senators who are known party members, the political parties can (probably) count on the votes of 33 party candidates or known supporters, or about 27% of this likely electorate. There may of course be party members or sympathisers who are not officially candidates, but participation in a party’s election campaign is likely to be a reliable indicator of ballot box loyalty.

The influence of this “captive” vote, which would translate into a total of 54 seats in the 200-seat Cosa, would of course be proportionality greater the lower the turnout. Maximising this loyal vote is also crucial in the “first past the post” race to be largest party. The FreeDems have publicly declared their ambition to overtake the RUMP, and thus be in pole position in what will no doubt be a drawn out government formation process.

We can also assume that many of these party members will have personal ties with less active or politically committed Talossans and so would help get out the party’s message beyond the confines of the Wittenberg audience.

Based on an assumed 50% turnout, ETT estimates the impact of this “core” vote as follows:

ModRads – 7 votes
The recently announced Cosa candidate list of the MRPT contained 5 names, including outgoing Senator Epic da Lhiun. Adding the party’s other serving Senators, party leader Lüc da Schir and Sevastáin Pinátsch, this gives us a probable minimum of 7 votes, or about 6% of the likely electorate. This would translate into a minimum of 12 seats.

FreeDems – 10 votes
The FreeDems have announced a 10-candidate Cosa list, including (currently unopposed) Senate candidates C. Carlüs Xheraltescù and Munditenens Tresplet. This gives us a probable minimum of 10 votes, or 8% of the likely electorate. This would translate into a minimum of 16 seats.

TNC – 3 votes
The TNC has announced a three-member candidate list. Party leader Breneir Itravilatx also claims committed but discreet support from another two voters, who do not wish to be publicly identified with the party, but this cannot be confirmed. Thus this gives us a probable minimum of 3 votes, or 2% of the likely electorate. This would translate into a minimum of 4 seats.

The RUMP – 13 votes
The RUMP does not publish an official candidate list as such, but its electoral advertising in Berich’t Talossan claims 16 members in “Our Team”. However 3 of those named (Canun, Preston and Dun) do not appear to have voted in the 48th Cosa election, so I will discount them from this estimate. This gives us a probable minimum of 13 votes, or 11% of the likely electorate. This would translate into a minimum of 22 seats.

49th Cosa Election: FreeDems launch campaign, say no to coalition deals

Free Democrats of Talossa leader Senator Miestrâ Schivâ has issued a statement on the party’s electoral strategy for the 49th Cosa election, and revelaed its endorsements for the four Senate seats up for election this term. As reported by ETT, the actual start date of the election is still a subject of confusion, due to the timing of the royal Writ of Dissolution.

The statement announces that a FreeDem Shadow Cabinet will be announced “before the election”. The choice of spokerspersons will be made by the party leader “in consultation” with the party, and will not be based on party affiliation, but on the “best active government team”. The Cosa candidate list and Shadow Cabinet will be announced “within a week”, after the list agreed by party leaders will be put to a vote of the party members.

The statement also revealed that the FreeDems will “not join a coalition government after the election”. If not in a position to form a government, either majority or as a minority, the FreeDems will support “someone else”, voting confidence on the basis of their “performance and programme”.

The FreeDem campaign website, which prominently displays an “endorsement” from historic Talossan leader Danihél Lauriér, also lists the party’s endorsements for Senate. S:reu Ian Anglatzara has been endorsed for the vacant Senate seat for Cezembre, with outgoing Seneschal C. Carlüs Xheráltescù has been endorsed for the seat from Fiovâ, where the incumbent Senator Miestrâ Schivâ is leaving the Senäts to return to the Cosa. The party has also endorsed incumbents Munditenens Tresplet and Magniloqeu da Lhiun, Senators for Maricopa and Maritiimi-Maxhestic respectively.

BHAID: 118$ for UNICEF, Administrator steps down

Françal Ian Lux MC has publised the BHAID Act of 2015, which if passed by the Ziu will authorise the Kingdom’s Bureau of Humanitarian Aid and International Development to donate the proceeds of the recently concluded BHAID appeal to the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF). As reported in ETT this weekend, US$130 was raised in donations. After processing fees the amount available for the donation is US$118.17. [ETT: Inxheneu Crovâ donated $50 to the appeal]

According to its official website UNICEF was founded in December 1946 to provide aid to children displaced by the Second World War. In 1953 its mission was made perpetual, and in 1965 it was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. The organsation is active in 192 countries working to promote the health, nutrition and education of children.

S:reu Lux’s legislation states that the Governors of BHAID decided to support UNICEF due to its work with refugees from the civil war in Syria. UNICEF is seeking to raise US$624 million in funding for 2015 alone to support its efforts to help children and their families displaced by the conflict.

The proposal was welcomed by RUMP leader Sir Alexandreu Davinescu MC, who described the organisation as “highly-rated by most charity auditors” and that it “seems like a good choice”. He also congratulated BHAID on “a good job”. Ian Plätschisch MC, a Governor of BHAID along with S:reu Lux, has requested to be added as a co-sponsor of the Bill.

BHAID is supervised by a Board of Governors, including an Administrator. It was announced yesterday that the incumbent Administrator Dr. Prithi Singh Ravish would no be continuing in the role. The reasons for the resignation are not clear but Foreign Minister Breneir Itravilatx stated that Dr Ravish’s resignation had “something to do with Talossans not being recognized in the international arena”. The Minister further announced that he would be assuming the role of Administrator temporarily until a replacement can be found.

November Clark Results: Coalition wins VoC, 4 MCs forfeit seats

According to the November Clark results published by the Chancery, Talossan Socialist Party MCs Gaglhen Fortaleça and Daniel Candee, along with independent MC Nicholas Hayes and RUMP MC Bradley Collin Holmes have exited the Ziu after their failure to vote in two successive Clark led to the forfeiture of their seats. These MCs held between them 33 seats in the Cosa, so along with the former assignment of errant Progressive MC Vit Caçéir, 37 Cosa seats remain unasigned at the time of writing.

Despite a strident condemnation of the government’s record by opposition leader Sir Alexandreu Davinescu MC, and the recent public tensions between coalition parties, the government survived the Vote of Confidence (94 Për/58 Contrâ). The split was along party lines as the remaining RUMP MCs were alone in voting against confidence.

Eights bills and Organic Law amendements were published in the Clark, of which five passed. Notable bills included:

The Rebalancing Finances Act (Cosa:141P/0C/11A, Senäts: 5P/0C/1A) was proposed by Sir Alexandreu Davinescu MC and Senator Eovart Grischun and reduces party registration fees by 50%, to US$10. This fee is payable by each party that wishes to stand for election to the Cosa. The Bill also revises the rules by which additional voluntary fundraising for the needs of the state are conducted, and reinforces the prohibition already included in El Lexhatx against mandatory donations or compulsory taxation.

The Transparency and Protection Bill, (Cosa:60P/81C/11A, Senäts: 3P/2C/1A) proposed by Sir Alexandreu Davinescu MC, would have simplified the freedom of information procedure already included in El Lexhatx, as well as the controls on the disclosure of personal information on citizens by the government or administration. The Bill passed in the Senäts but was defeated in the Cosa.

The sole amendement voted on, the Mandatory Cosa Lists Act and Amendment (Cosa:84P/33C/35A, Senäts: 2P/3C/1A) proposed by Ian Plätschisch MC and C. Carlüs Xheraltescù MC would have provided for the mandatory publication of seat assignments by party leaders before each election. Currently seats are assigned by party leaders after the election results are known subject to an individual limit on the number of seats any MC can hold. The Amendement failed to receive a majority in the Senäts and was thus defeated.