Category Archives: da Lhiun

October Clark: One for the road…

The results of the final Clark of the 49th Cosa were published by the Chancery this week.

Without surprise,the government easily survived the last VoC of the term, 94 votes Për to 18 Contrâ. However due to absent coalition MCs the government did so without achieving an absolute majority of seats.

RUMP leader Sir Alexandreu Davinescu unexpectedly failed to vote on the Clark, a first for him in a number of years. Sir Alexandreu was among 5 MCs, representing 50 of the 200 seats in the Cosa, who failed to vote on the Clark.

It was a disappointing Clark for Secretary of State Marti-Pair Furxheir, who saw both of his attempts to reform the term of office of the Cosa fail. The head of the Chancery is not an MZ but may in principle Clark bills relating to electoral matters.

The twin proposals would ended the need for the King to formally dissolve the Cosa at the end of its term . They would also have closed the possibity of early dissolution by fixing the term of office of the lower house, but in the case of the first would have extended that term of office to a year, and the second would have limited the usual six-month term to five Clarks. 

A related measure that would have granted the Seneschal the authority to recess the Ziu for both July and August, proposed by ModRad Senator Epic da Lhiun, was also defeated, this time due to Senäts opposition.

It was also an unfortunate Clark for the Organic Law Standing Committee, whose second set of Organic Law amendments proposed by ModRad MC Ian Plätschisch were abandoned due to the last-minute discovery of a drafting error in the bill. The OLSC is a working group of interested MZs from different parties who seek to remove redundancies and inappropriate clauses from the constitution. 

By contrast, the Ziu looked more favourably upon reform proposals made bySeneschal Sir Cresti Siervicül and FreeDem leader Senator Dien Tresplet.

Sir Cresti successfully called on the Ziu to close the door on elections for the Túischac’h of the Cosa, a reform first introduced in 2014 and which has remained controversial in practice since. Sir Cresti’s bill, if approved by referendum, will return to the previous system of appointment by the Crown on the nomination of the Seneschal, but with the Seneschal now legally required to consult other party leaders beforehand. 

Senator Tresplet’s bill would remove an historical reference to the punishment of “anti-Talossan activities” in the Organic Law. The Senator claimed that the use of the term was reminiscent of “McCarthyism” and inappropriate in modern Talossa, with which the Ziu apparently agreed, sending the amendment to referendum.

October Clark: One for the road…

The results of the final Clark of the 49th Cosa were published by the Chancery this week.

Without surprise,the government easily survived the last VoC of the term, 94 votes Për to 18 Contrâ. However due to absent coalition MCs the government did so without achieving an absolute majority of seats.

RUMP leader Sir Alexandreu Davinescu unexpectedly failed to vote on the Clark, a first for him in a number of years. Sir Alexandreu was among 5 MCs, representing 50 of the 200 seats in the Cosa, who failed to vote on the Clark.

It was a disappointing Clark for Secretary of State Marti-Pair Furxheir, who saw both of his attempts to reform the term of office of the Cosa fail. The head of the Chancery is not an MZ but may in principle Clark bills relating to electoral matters.

The twin proposals would ended the need for the King to formally dissolve the Cosa at the end of its term . They would also have closed the possibity of early dissolution by fixing the term of office of the lower house, but in the case of the first would have extended that term of office to a year, and the second would have limited the usual six-month term to five Clarks. 

A related measure that would have granted the Seneschal the authority to recess the Ziu for both July and August, proposed by ModRad Senator Epic da Lhiun, was also defeated, this time due to Senäts opposition.

It was also an unfortunate Clark for the Organic Law Standing Committee, whose second set of Organic Law amendments proposed by ModRad MC Ian Plätschisch were abandoned due to the last-minute discovery of a drafting error in the bill. The OLSC is a working group of interested MZs from different parties who seek to remove redundancies and inappropriate clauses from the constitution. 

By contrast, the Ziu looked more favourably upon reform proposals made bySeneschal Sir Cresti Siervicül and FreeDem leader Senator Dien Tresplet.

Sir Cresti successfully called on the Ziu to close the door on elections for the Túischac’h of the Cosa, a reform first introduced in 2014 and which has remained controversial in practice since. Sir Cresti’s bill, if approved by referendum, will return to the previous system of appointment by the Crown on the nomination of the Seneschal, but with the Seneschal now legally required to consult other party leaders beforehand. 

Senator Tresplet’s bill would remove an historical reference to the punishment of “anti-Talossan activities” in the Organic Law. The Senator claimed that the use of the term was reminiscent of “McCarthyism” and inappropriate in modern Talossa, with which the Ziu apparently agreed, sending the amendment to referendum.

New Deputy Minister of Immigration appointed

Minister of Immigration Senator Munditenens Tresplet announced oon.5th February the appointment of a new Deputy Minister of Immigration, S:reu Bradley Higgs. The announcement has come after some concerns were expressed by opposition MZs over the effectiveness of the Immigration Bureau following recent incidents.

As noted by ETT on Twitter, S:reu Higgs became a citizen only in January of this year. When asked to comment on the appointment of a new citizen to a potentially sensitive post, Senator Tresplet explained that S:reu Higgs had expressed interest in trying to improve the technology behind the immigration application system. As the government was near the end of its term and the Deputy Ministry was vacant, Senator Tresplet thought it would be useful for S:reu Higg’s research to see the system in action directly. He also stated that while he acts on every request personally “I could use some help”.

The Minister emphasised however that “any problem applications or prospectives are handled by me personally, and all Clause 5 terminations are also handled by me personally.” Indeed “Clause 5”, a reference to El Lexhatx E.5, was actually used in connection with a problematic application in recent weeks.

A prospective citizen, whom we will refer to as “J” to preserve the confidentiality of the immigration process, gave a number of troubling responses to enquiries about his background and professional life, leading to open scepticism among commentators about the veracity of his claims.

It later transpired that J had had his application for citizenship terminated  under Clause 5 by the then Minister Baron Hooligan in 2012, following inappropriate communication with certain citizens. Under the provisions of El Lexhatx, once E.5 is invoked, the applicant is prohibited from applying again for citizenship.

Senator Tresplet therefore decided on 1st February  to apply the precedent established by Baron Hooligan and terminate the second application. He explained that he was not aware of the first application by J when granting him access to the Immigration forum.

The J termination was one of a number incidents brought to the attention of the government in recent weeks.

On 23rd January, a terpelaziun was submitted by RUMP leader Sir Alexandreu Davinescu requesting information about a complaint he had received from an applicant, who had not received a response to his request, made via the web-based immigration form some time before. The government confirmed that there had indeed been technical problems with the forum, leading to delay in receiving applications, but that these had now been resolved.

On 5th February, ModRad Senator Magniloqueu Épiqeu da Lhiun also submitted a terpelaziun, inquiring as to why a Wittenberg user, apparently a prospective citizen, had not been presented to the nation as required under the immigration law. After investigation it transpired in this case the applicant had indeed been presented, in November 2015, but had not immediately used his new access, and appears to have subsequently changed his forum display name.

The Minister later took to the Shoutbox to reassure the public that the Ministry always sends a guide on how to access Wittenberg as well as an explanation of Witt posting etiquette to each new user. Both MZs who submitted questions expressed their satisgaction with the responses received, with Senator da Lhiun encouraging the Minister to “keep up the good work”.

MRPT Conference: leadership contest exposes coalition doubts

As the Fifth Congress of the MRPT gets underway, two contenders for the leadership have announced themselves. Outgoing party leader, Distain and Finance Minister Senator Lüc da Schir has announced that he will seek another term as leader, with Deputy Interior Minister Ian Plâtschisch MC also stepping forward.

Senator da Schir stated that if re-elected he will not “enter in coalition deals with any other party”. S:reu da Schir further stated that in his opinion that a “lay-low crossbench term” would be healthy for the ModRads, and that “sometimes supporting a minority cabinet from the outside can get us more than being inside it (and faring very badly anyway)”.

The latter remark seems to be an implicit acknowledgement of the criticism that MRPT Ministers have underperformed during the 48th Cosa. According to the Senator, a term outside of government would allow the MRPT to renew itself and “get to the 50th Cosa with a strong team of active members”. The Senator also declared that he favoured promoting more active MCs over “putting our best people in the Senate”.

S:reu Plätschisch wished to emphasise that his decision to contest the leadership was not a reflection of a lack of confidence in the Senator. He stated however that while he had no objection to remaining outside of government in principle, he felt his approach was different enough from his party leader’s that he “wanted to give the party an alternative”.

S:reu Plätschisch stressed that he did not think the party should pursue a coalition “to the point of being trampled on”, but he did not agree that Talossa would benefit from a minority government, and that the party should “keep its options open, depending on election results and negotiations turn out”. He further stated that despite the negative perception some party members had of Sir Alexandreu Davinescu MC the RUMP should not be excluded from coalition consideration. He also declared that he felt a coalition with the FDT was “unlikley”, though not objectionable to him.

Other senior party members weighed in on the topic, which was moved to the Congress Hall for a broader discussion of the party’s strategy.

Former party leader and Seneschal Glüc da Dhi declared that in his opinion the party “should take our responsibility in cabinet” and influence policy directly. He also stated that he did not support a minority government of either RUMP of FDT, and “could support a coalition” with either.

Senator Magniloqueu Épiqeu da Lhiun expressed support for Senator da Schir’s policy, stating that “I think we have been too government-driven” and that the party “should take some time to come to its senses”.

Packed December Clark ushers 48th Cosa to an end

Secretary of State Marti-Pair Furxheir has published the 6th and final Clark of the 48th Cosa. Ten proposals have been submitted by MZs, including two Organic Law amendments-a record for the 48th Cosa, topping the eight measures listed in the 5th Clark.

The Mandatory Cosa Lists Amendment (48RZ35) has been reintroduced by Ian Plätschisch MC and C. Carlüs Xheraltescù MC after its defeat in the November Clark. The measure has not been changed since its first examination by the Ziu, but in his comments on Wittenberg S:reu Plätschisch expressed confidence in its eventual passage, stating that “the only reason it failed was because some senators forgot to vote”. Senator Miesträ Schivä however declared herself “not optimistic” about the amendment’s ultimate fate, as she anticipates a better turnout from RUMP MCs who a priori should have reservations about the introduction of mandatory candidate lists.

S:reu Plätschisch has also proposed Another Reformatting Bill (48RZ36), as “I like the law to look pretty” and “if I Clark a bill next month I will have Clarked a bill in all six Clarks”. The bill would amend the procedure around terpelaziun (interpellation) of Ministers by MZs.

Senator Magniloqueu Épiqeu da Lhiun, finding time from a busy schedule that according to the preamble of his bill includes auctions, snoring pets and avoiding his studies has published his direct democracy proposal, the long-gestating People Will Enact Amendment (48RZ37), as well as its accompanying ordinary legislation. This would offer groups of at least six citizens who are not Members of the Ziu the opportunity to propose legislation (but not amend the Organic Law). The proposed decree would then be approved (or otherwise) in a plebiscite. The amendment would also permit a group of eight citizens the ability to force a Ziu vote on a constitutional amendment.

Senator da Lhiun has also proposed The Hopes Will Come True Bill (48RZ38), a Talossan-language translation of the text of El Lexhatx, which previously expressed the “hope” that the legal code would be available in the national language.

Newly-appointed Attorney-General Senator Miestrâ Schivâ has proposed The Can’t You Guys Run A Simple Election Bill (48RZ29), an effort to establish a clear procedure for electing the Túischac’h of the Cosa, after the recent controversy that has left the lower house without a presiding officer for the whole of the 48th Cosa.

She has also proposed The Canton Borders Sing This Song Bill (48RZ30), which reorganises the legal provisions in El Lexhatx concerning the boundries of the provincial cantons, and The Arkell v. Pressdram Bill (48RZ32), which enshrines in Talossan law the notorious response of the British satirical magazine Private Eye to what it considered a vexatious attempt to intimidate it through the use of UK libel law.

Scribe of Abbavilla Munditenens-Txec Patritz da Biondeu-Garcia MC has proposed The Caught In The Act Bill (48RZ33) that would require all future legislation prclaimed by the monarchy to be physically signed in triplicate. One copy would be retained by the King, and one other each sent to the Scribe and the National Archivist, and provides a modest budget for the purpose.

Secretary of State Marti-Pair Furxheir has proposed The Database Accessibility and Protection Bill (48RZ31), that would create the Office of Royal Data Clerk, de jure separating the ofice of Secretary of State from the technical management of the national Database. A copy of the database would be presented over to the members of the Upperost Cort and the database itself would become the property of the nation. The creation of the Royal Data Clerkship has been a long-standing request of S:reu Furxheir, who is presently the owner of the Database, which he began as a private enterprise unconnected with his legal duties as Secretary of State.

Finally The BHAID Act of 2015 (48RZ34) has been proposed by Minister of Culture (and BHAID Governor) Françal Ian Lux MC. The Bill would provide legislative authority to the Bureau of Humanitarian Assistance to send the proceeds of the recent fundraising appeal to the project chosen by the Board of Governors, UNICEF refugee assisatnce in Syria (discussed by ETT here). [ETT: Inxheneu Crovâ is Administrator of BHAID]

LibCon Controversy: MRPT reactions

In apparent response to Senator Rôibeardescù’s statement that he “would rather fight for a party that knows what it wants, instead of one that doesn’t”, Ian Plätschisch MC published a copy of the MRPT manifesto for the former’s attention. In extending an invitation to the Senator to consider the MRPT as a new political home, S:reu Plätschisch stated that “a vote’s a vote”, clarifying later that he intended this formula to mean that the support of any individual voter is welcome, but that he did not intend to recruit the Senator as a party member.

Senator Magniloqueu Épiqeu da Lhiun of Maritimi-Maxhestic criticised S.reu Plätschisch’s initiative, stating that his party colleague did “not represent the MRPT that I know”. He further remarked, in response to criticism from Senator Miestrâ Schivâ of Distain da Schir’s silence on the issue at that point, that “(the party leader) is just one voice among many”. He also noted what he claimed was the ZRT leader’s “alacrity to criticise the MRPT at the first chance you get. I am accustomed to your vitriolic remarks towards the RUMP, but I expected more amity towards us”.

Former MRPT leader Glüc da Dhi noted that “it’s not like the FDA had a problem having him as a member untill he left…now…he’s suddenly a ‘sleazoid'”. He also called on other parties “to not get involved immediately but give Txosue and his former party some time to sort things out for themselves first”, stating that he understood S:reu Plätschisch’s personal initiative as a response to the RUMP’s first move in publishing their manifesto.

Proclamation Crisis: Uppermost Cort to proceed on da Schir petition

The fate of the petition for declarative relief submitted by former Seneschal Senator Lüc da Schir will be decided by a three-judge panel of el Cort Inalt beginning this week. This follows the receipt of a motion from counsel for the King Sir C.M. Siervicül to dismiss the case. The petition seeks to have 47RZ28 accepted as a valid Organic Law amendment despite the King’s “explicit refusal to proclaim” it.

Senator da Schir’s petition was filed in the waning days of the previous government, when Senator da Schir was acting Attorney-General as well as Seneschal. Senator da Schir requested that the Uppermost Cort declare that 47RZ28 met the requirments to amend the Organic Law, despite the King’s assertion that an “explicit refusal to proclaim” an amendment rendered it void. Senator da Schir argued that despite the wording of Article XV of the organic law in practice no prior Organic Law amendments have actually been proclaimed by the King, and thus under “well-affirmed precedent” royal proclamation of constitutional amendments should be considered symbolic, rendering the King’s refusal to proclaim 47RZ28 immaterial.

In an amicus curiae submission accepted by the Cort, Senator Magniloqueu Épiqeu da Lhiun stated that in his view that the Crown’s powers were “never meant to supersede the ultimate Sovereignty of the People”. Arguing that the Organic Law locates ultimate sovereignty with the people, Senator da Lhiun argued that no act, or inaction of the King should allow the result of a popular vote to be set aside as this would violate the fundamental principle of the Organic Law.

After a delay granted by the Cort due to travel and a hectic work schedule, Sir C.M. Siervicül submitted a motion to dismiss Senator da Schir’s petition. Arguing that while tacit consent on the part of the King may be presumed by his silence with respect to previous Organic Law amendments, this does not deprive the King of the right to take action (or in this case explicitly refrain from action) in the future. Sir Cresti further argued that proclamation of Organic Law amendments is plainly necessary for them to be enacted, with the approval of the Cosa and Senäts and popular referendum being preconditions to but not substitutes for this decisive step.

The case will be heard by a three-judge panel consisting of Puisne Justices Cjantscheir, Edwards, and dal Nordselvă, with Justice Edwards acting as chair. It has not yet been announced whether Attorney-General Caçeur will present the government case, or if Senator da Schir will continue as counsel for the government.

Recommendation: Appointment of an Attorney-General

The Office of the Prime Minister of Talossa
__________________________
L’Óifisch dal Seneschal del Regipäts Talossa

Recommendation: Appointment of an Attorney-General

Voastra Maxhestá —

I come now before the throne seeking an audience to recommend the appointment of a Minister to Your Majesty’s Government.

Talossa is an addicting habit, as our website states. However, for reasons which often are beyond their will, many of us are forced to dedicate more time to their lives, to deal with unexpected personal issues, or with an upcoming important event; sometimes, instead, they are simply away due to less important problems (thankfully) like issues with their internet connection, or because they’re traveling. Luckily, this seems to be the case with Minister da Lhiun – although we are relieved to learn that nothing serious has happened to him, I feel compelled to replace him to ensure that the Government keeps working smoothly and the upcoming judicial cases concerning the Government are properly dealt with.

SO WHEREAS Lex.D.2.1 states that “All other Cabinet officers are appointed by the Seneschal (Prime Minister), serve at his pleasure, are responsible to him, and derive their powers from him”, and

WHEREAS one of the Ministers of my Government is temporarily unavailable; and

WHEREAS it is of our best interest to ensure that the Government is fully functional, and that all Ministers and Deputies are around to do their jobs; and

WHEREAS, thankfully, an excellently qualificated replacement exists and is willing to replace S:r da Lhiun in his position as Attorney-General; so

THEREFORE I, Lüc da Schir, Seneschal del Regipäts Talossan, with all duly vested authority and stuff, hereby recommend that Your Majesty appoint:

100px-JusticeBadgeDr. Txec dal Nordselvă
to the position of
Attorney-General

FURTHERMORE, S:r da Lhiun is not relieved from any other office he is currently holding within the Cabinet, and will continue to serve as Deputy Attorney-General.FURTHER-FURTHERMORE, WHEREAS Lex.D.2.1 states that “anything that any Minister can do (officially), the Seneschal may (if he desires) do himself.”, and WHEREAS until HM the King of Talossa countersigns this recommendation, Talossa will continue to have an inactive Attorney-General; so

THEREFORE until the required Royal Assent to this recommendation, the Seneschal will unofficially serve as Attorney-General ad interim, his duties including representing the Government in the pending court cases.

Confident that the Crown will consent to this recommendation, may I be the first to congratulate Dr. Nordselva in advance and and to wish him all the best for his term in office.

Lüc da Schir
Seneschal


I of course approve this nomination, and hereby appoint Dr Nordselva Attorney General.

— John R.

Recommendations – Appointment of a Cabinet

The Office of the Prime Minister of Talossa
__________________________
L’Óifisch dal Seneschal del Regipäts Talossa

Recommendation: Appointment of a Cabinet

Voastra Maxhestá —

I come now before the throne seeking an audience to recommend the appointment of Ministers to Your Majesty’s Government.

The Moderate Radical Party of Talossa, els Zefençadéirs del Repúblicanismeu Talossán, the Liberal Congress and the Progressive Party have agreed on the appointment of a cabinet consisting of the following ministers. We have deliberately chosen to slim down the team by having the Distáin hold a ministerial portfolio too and by merging the Home Affairs, Immigration and Defence portfolio to be held by a single Interior Minister as per 47PD01.

This is a team of ambitious and experienced people who are all eager to get things done and show Talossa that an active government is not an utopia. Allow me to add as a personal remark, Your Majesty, that I regard this as an absolute “dream team”, and that I have the maximum confidence in these citizens’ loyalty and dedication to the Kingdom.

Therefore, I, Lüc da Schir, Seneschal del Regipäts Talossan, with all duly vested authority and stuff, hereby recommend that Your Majesty appoint these fellow Talossan citizens and loyal subjects of yours to the following cabinet posts:

DistainBadgeMiestrâ Schivâ, UrN
to the position of
Distain;

HomeAffairsBadgeImmigrationBadgeDefenceBadgeCarlüs Xheraltescú
to the position of
Minister of the Interior;

FinanceBadgeOwen Edwards
to the position of
Minister of Finance;

JusticeBadgeMagniloqeu Epiqeu da Lhiun
to the position of
Attorney-General;

StuffBadgeSevastain Pinatsch
to the position of
Minister of Stuff

ForeignAffairsBadgeMunditenens Txec Patritz da Biondeu
to the position of
Minister of Foreign Affairs;

CultureBadgeMiestrâ Schivâ
to the position of
Minister of Culture;

Confident that the Crown will consent to accept these recommendations, may I be the first to congratulate each of the newly appointed Ministers. I look forward to working with you all over the upcoming term.

Lüc da Schir
Seneschal


S:reu Seneschal —

Trusting that we have all the names right now :), I thank you for these recommendations, and am pleased hereby to make these appointments. Congratulations, thanks, and best wishes to you and all who have agreed to serve in your Cabinet.

— John R

The Government totters over disputes between Ministers

Just a couple of days inside this Cosa's Month of Recess, halfway through the 46th Cosa, the Government is living its first serious crisis since the Cabinet took office. As if Istefan Perþonest's resignations as the Finance Minister, following the Senate's refusal of the coinage bill, weren't enough, a heated debate arose between prominent members of the Cabinet: MRPT's leader Glüc da Dhi (Seneschal) and whip Lüc da Schir (Minister of Stuff), ZRT's leader Miestra Schiva (Minister of Culture) and Liberal leader Carlüs Xheraltescu.

The argument seems to have begun with Xheraltescu affirming that his party was the only to prioritize "freedom, localism, reform and fighting conformity" and da Dhi opposing his view, providing examples for each point made by Xheraltescu.

Soon enough, the discussion moved over MC Andrinescu, former MRPT member serving in the Cosa, when ZRT's Schivâ blamed the MRPT leadership's actions over Andrinescu's seats. A hot topic of the evening was also whether the Liberal Congress would be accepted as a full coalition member.

Later on, Distain Xheraltescu resigned from the Cabinet, with a heated attack over the Seneschal, accused to be uncommunicative towards his ministers and to have repeatedly snubbed his party. Da Dhi replied stating that Xheraltescu was leaving only because he didn't get his way on the coalition deal and that his [da Dhi's] reasoning wasn't arbitrary but consistent with his reasonings in the past years. Schivâ, instead, begged Xheraltescu to reconsider.

After Xheraltescu's resignations, the stability of the Government is at risk. MRPT's Minister da Schir has reportedly softened his position, submitting to the Government a seven points plan to reconcile its Ministers. Among them, a call to da Dhi to recognise the Liberal Congress as an official Coalition party and to Xheraltescu to retract his resignation.

The recognition of the LC as an official Coalition party has the favour of the ZRT and of a majority of ministers plus MRPTer da Schir. The MRPT, including the Seneschal, appears to be still against it, although da Schir's aperture to Xheraltescu was followed by da Dhi's decision to hold talks among his party.

To further confirm the Government's willingness to continue working, among the seven points is a request to the Seneschal to announce Perþonest's successor as soon as possible.