Four MCs Out for Failure to Vote

Secretary of State Marti-Pair Furxheir has announced that four Members of the Cosa have lost their seats for failing to vote in two consecutive Clarks.

Those exiting their elected roles include Ian da Bitour, Owen  Edwards, and Brad Holmes—who previously lost his MC seat in November 2015 for the same reason.

Most surprising is the loss by first-term MC Inxhenéu Crovâ. A former editor at ETT, Crova announced in November 2016 that he was extending his leave of absence until after the election, to avoid the perception of conflict of interest, but presumably also to devote more effort to campaigning on Wittenberg. However, even after a successful run for office, Crovâ was never to return. The ETT offices were eventually declared abandoned and the publication placed under new management.

Hiatus

Your correspondent is taking (or rather extending) his hiatus until after the election. 

As announced on Wittenberg, I am a candidate on the FreeDem list for the 50th Cosa. So as not to have to engage myself insome mind bending double-think, I will refrain from reporting on the ins and outs of the election until it is over.

Hiatis

Your correspondent is taking (or rather extending) his hiatus until after the election. 

As announced on Wittenberg, I am a candidate on the FreeDem list for the 50th Cosa. So as not to have to engage myself insome mind bending double-think, I will refrain from reporting on the ins and outs of the election until it is over.

US election: Trump victory, carries WI

Against most poll predictions, Republican candidate Donald Trump appears certain to win the Presidency of the United States, defeating Democratic nominee Hilary Clinton.

According to an article in the Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel, Mr Trump is predicted to win the state of Wisconsin, in which the North American territories of the Kingdom are located. 

However according to unofficial results Mrs Clinton has appeared to have carried Milwaukee County itself. This area, which adjoins the national territory, is a traditional Democratic Party stronghold in the state. 
According to the Journal-Sentinel, Mr Trump would be the first Republican party candidate to win the state since 1984, and his success is ascribed to an unanticipated surge in support from rural and low income white voters. Mrs Clinton had indeed been predicted to win the state by most observers, leading in opinion polls throughout the campaign.

Incumbent Wisconsin Republican Senator Ron Johnson was also re-elected, defeating former Senator Russ Feingold. The Republican Party also retained its majority in the US House of Representatives, led by the Wisconsin-based Speaker of the House, Congressman Paul Ryan.

US election: Trump victory, carries WI

Against most poll predictions, Republican candidate Donald Trump appears certain to win the Presidency of the United States, defeating Democratic nominee Hilary Clinton.

According to an article in the Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel, Mr Trump is predicted to win the state of Wisconsin, in which the North American territories of the Kingdom are located. 

However according to unofficial results Mrs Clinton has appeared to have carried Milwaukee County itself. This area, which adjoins the national territory, is a traditional Democratic Party stronghold in the state. 
According to the Journal-Sentinel, Mr Trump would be the first Republican party candidate to win the state since 1984, and his success is ascribed to an unanticipated surge in support from rural and low income white voters. Mrs Clinton had indeed been predicted to win the state by most observers, leading in opinion polls throughout the campaign.

Incumbent Wisconsin Republican Senator Ron Johnson was also re-elected, defeating former Senator Russ Feingold. The Republican Party also retained its majority in the US House of Representatives, led by the Wisconsin-based Speaker of the House, Congressman Paul Ryan.

50th Cosa election: King dissolves Cosa

HM King John has dissolved the 49th Cosa, formally beginning the historic 50th Cosa general election.

The King thanked the Members of the outgoing Cosa and Seneschal Sir Cresti Siervicül and his government for their service. The King’s issuance of the writ of dissolution allows the Chancery to proceed with its election preparations.

The head of the Chancery, Secretary of State Marti-Pair Furxheir, confirmed that the election would be held between 15th November and 1st December. He also declared that parties that wished to contest the election should contact him as soon as possible to ensure their presence on the ballot.

The Moderate Radical Party, whose Party Congress will conclude this week, is currently voting on the final version of its election manifesto. Party leader Senator Lüc da Schir has told ETT that he is prepared to serve as Seneschal, and that he would be “disappointed” if his party failed to surpass 40 seats in the election. 

The ModRad leader has struck a noticeably more confident tone in his Congress interventions when compared with the 49th Cosa campaign, and during its Congress party leaders have insisted on its legislative record in the 49th Cosa and its central position in the political chequerboard.

Colonel Mximo Carbonel has also declared his intention to run for the Cosa. The outspoken Republican has promised to “make Talossa great again”, an allusion that prompted a dismayed “please no” from ModRad MC Glüc da Dhi.

No official statement has been issued by the FreeDems or the RUMP, the two largest parties in tne Cosa. Requests for comment from the leaders of both parties had not been answered at the time of writing.

For the FreeDems, acting party leader Senator Dien Tresplet had previously told ETT that he intended to lead his party into the next election, with a formal leadership vote to be held in December.

The FreeDems, despite being the largest party in the 49th Cosa, have had limited activity recently. Senior party stalwarts have been occupied with extra-Talossan affairs, and the surprise resignation of Miestrâ Schivâ at the beginning of the Summer left the party effectively leaderless for a number of months.

RUMP leader Sir Alexandreu Davinescu has maintained a low profile on Wittenberg recently, undoubtedly related to the recent birth of his daughter. No details are as yet available as to the RUMP’s plans for the campaign, in contrast with the detailed platform presented during the 49th Cosa campaign.

Seneschal Sir Cresti Siervicül, his party colleague, has however enquired about the procedures for registering a party. As well as the Coda campaign, Senate seats in Florencia and Vuode currently held by RUMP-aligned incumbents are also up for election.

With the resignation of its founder and party leader Breneir Itravilatx, the TNC would seem to be defunct, though surviving MC Tamàs Ònodi continued to cast votes in the Cosa. Progressive Party leader Owen Edwards has also continued to vote in the Cosa, though it is not clear if he has any plans to contest the election.

50th Cosa election: King dissolves Cosa

HM King John has dissolved the 49th Cosa, formally beginning the historic 50th Cosa general election.

The King thanked the Members of the outgoing Cosa and Seneschal Sir Cresti Siervicül and his government for their service. The King’s issuance of the writ of dissolution allows the Chancery to proceed with its election preparations.

The head of the Chancery, Secretary of State Marti-Pair Furxheir, confirmed that the election would be held between 15th November and 1st December. He also declared that parties that wished to contest the election should contact him as soon as possible to ensure their presence on the ballot.

The Moderate Radical Party, whose Party Congress will conclude this week, is currently voting on the final version of its election manifesto. Party leader Senator Lüc da Schir has told ETT that he is prepared to serve as Seneschal, and that he would be “disappointed” if his party failed to surpass 40 seats in the election. 

The ModRad leader has struck a noticeably more confident tone in his Congress interventions when compared with the 49th Cosa campaign, and during its Congress party leaders have insisted on its legislative record in the 49th Cosa and its central position in the political chequerboard.

Colonel Mximo Carbonel has also declared his intention to run for the Cosa. The outspoken Republican has promised to “make Talossa great again”, an allusion that prompted a dismayed “please no” from ModRad MC Glüc da Dhi.

No official statement has been issued by the FreeDems or the RUMP, the two largest parties in tne Cosa. Requests for comment from the leaders of both parties had not been answered at the time of writing.

For the FreeDems, acting party leader Senator Dien Tresplet had previously told ETT that he intended to lead his party into the next election, with a formal leadership vote to be held in December.

The FreeDems, despite being the largest party in the 49th Cosa, have had limited activity recently. Senior party stalwarts have been occupied with extra-Talossan affairs, and the surprise resignation of Miestrâ Schivâ at the beginning of the Summer left the party effectively leaderless for a number of months.

RUMP leader Sir Alexandreu Davinescu has maintained a low profile on Wittenberg recently, undoubtedly related to the recent birth of his daughter. No details are as yet available as to the RUMP’s plans for the campaign, in contrast with the detailed platform presented during the 49th Cosa campaign.

Seneschal Sir Cresti Siervicül, his party colleague, has however enquired about the procedures for registering a party. As well as the Coda campaign, Senate seats in Florencia and Vuode currently held by RUMP-aligned incumbents are also up for election.

With the resignation of its founder and party leader Breneir Itravilatx, the TNC would seem to be defunct, though surviving MC Tamàs Ònodi continued to cast votes in the Cosa. Progressive Party leader Owen Edwards has also continued to vote in the Cosa, though it is not clear if he has any plans to contest the election.

Opinion: When changing the OrgLaw, check it twice

The frankly confusing twin proposals clarked by the Secretary of State relating to the term of office of the Cosa, coupled with the unfortunate last-minute discovery of a drafting error in the OLSC’s latest hunt for OrgLaw deadwood, highlight the need for a more detailed scrutiny of OrgLaw changes by the Ziu.

Firstly, the well-intentioned privilege given to the Chancery, that allows a non-MZ direct access to the legislative Clark, should be withdrawn.

A non-member of the legislature can have the right to suggest action, by placing bills in the Hopper. They should not however be permitted to dictate the agenda for elected representatives. This is particularly true when he or she is unsure of the appropriate course of action themselves. That two mutually contradictory amendments proposed by the same person can land on the desks of MZs demonstrates that the current system is broken.

Secondly, no change to the Organic Law should appear on the Clark without the sponsorship of at least two MZs.

By obliging proposals to seek the approval of at least one other MZ before they can be Clarked, MZs will at least have to allow one other individual to scrutinise their text. This may make for improved bills in the Hopper, and better quality law overall.

Thirdly, no change to the Organic Law should be presented at referendum without having been considered twice by the Ziu. This might take the form of two “readings” on two separate Clarks, or by separate consecutive consideration by both houses of the Ziu- the latter would itself be an actualisation of our otherwise fictional bicameralism.

Even the most conscientous among our MZs can make mistakes, and extended scrutiny seems to ferret out these errors, as has been demonstrated by the abandonment of the OLSC amendments.

Either way, since amendments cannot take force until they have been approved by voters, at the next election, the Ziu has the opportunity to take more time to study in detail the consequences of each amendment. It should take it.

Opinion: When changing the OrgLaw, check it twice

The frankly confusing twin proposals clarked by the Secretary of State relating to the term of office of the Cosa, coupled with the unfortunate last-minute discovery of a drafting error in the OLSC’s latest hunt for OrgLaw deadwood, highlight the need for a more detailed scrutiny of OrgLaw changes by the Ziu.

Firstly, the well-intenioned privilege given to the Chancery, that allows a non-MZ direct access to the legislative Clark, should be withdrawn.

A non-member of the legislature can have the right to suggest action, by placing bills in the Hopper. They should not however be permitted to dictate the agenda for elected representatives. This is particularly true when he or she is unsure of the appropriate course of action themselves. That two mutually contradictory amendments proposed by the same person can land on the desks of MZs demonstrates that the current system is broken.

Secondly, no change to the Organic Law should appear on the Clark without the sponsorship of at least two MZs.

By obliging proposals to seek the approval of at least one other MZ before they can be Clarked, MZs will at least have to allow one other individual to scrutinise their text. This may make for improved bills in the Hopper, and better quality law overall.

Thirdly, no change to the Organic Law should be presented at referendum without having been considered twice by the Ziu. This might take the form of two “readings” on two separate Clarks, or by separate consecutive consideration by both houses of the Ziu- the latter would itself be an actualisation of our otherwise fictional bicameralism.

Even the most conscientous among our MZs can make mistakes, and extended scrutiny seems to ferret out these errors, as has been demonstrated by the abandonment of the OLSC amendments.

Either way, since amendments cannot take force until they have been approved by voters, at the next election, the Ziu has the opportunity to take more time to study in detail the consequences of each amendment. It should take it.

Chancery prepares for 50th Cosa election

Update: Five provinces will have Senäts elections this election. Incumbent Senator Sevastáin Pinátsch will also be seeking re-election (see comment)

Secretary of State Marti-Pair Furxheir has published the rules for the 50th Cosa election.

Parties planning to contest the election are encouraged to pre-register with the Chancery. As well as the Cosa election, four provinces will be electing a Senator, three under the auspices of the Chancery.

Benito and Vuode’s Senators are up for election following the usual schedule, while Florencia and Fiova are holding by-elections.

Benito Senator and ModRad Lüc da Schir has already announced he intends to seek an additional term in the Senäts. No other candidate has yet announced in this contest.

In the case of Vuode Senator Grischun has publicly announced that he will not seek an additional term as Senator. No candidate to replace him has emerged since this announcement.

Florencia will be voting to permanently replace its Upper House representative after the resignation and subsequent renunciation of citizenship of Pôl d’Aurìbuérg earlier this year. Mà la Mhà was appointed as a temporary relacement and appears to be returning to activity after a series of family bereavements limited his Talossan time.

Fiova will also elect a Senator to replace C. Carlüs Xheraltescú following his failure to vote on two consecutive Clarks. Fiova organises its own Senäts elections and so does not depend on the Chancery system.

The Chancery traditionally publishes the rules of the election well in advance of the actual launch. At the time of writing the King has yet to dissolve the Cosa as required under the Organic Law.

a Talossan Press Association affiliate publication